© 1998 Bernard SUZANNE   Last updated December 6, 1998 
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Oenoe

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Name of two Attic demes : one from the tribe Hippothoontides in northwestern Attica, along the border with Boeotia, and the other of the tribe Æantides, in northeastern Attica, north of Marathon.
The name Oenoe comes from the Greek word oinos, meaning "wine". The village bordering Boeotia was the cause of a border conflict in the time of king Thymoetes of Athens and king Xanthus of Thebes. As the war was dragging with no end in sight, the adversaries decided to settle the matter by a single fight between their two kings. But Thymoetes was afraid of Xanthus and so, he let it be known through all of Attica that he would leave his throne to whomever would take his place and fight Xanthus. Melanthus, a descendant of Neleus, king of Pylos in Messenia (the father of Nestor), who had settled in Attica after being ousted from Pylos by the Heraclidæ, volunteered. When the fight was about to start, Dionysus appeared behind Xanthus under the guise of an armed warrior. Not knowing what was happening, Melanthus accused Xanthus of violating the rules of the fight by bringind an assistant. Xanthus turned his head to see who was following him and Melanthus took advantage of this to kill him with his spear. After that, Melanthus became king of Athens (he was the father of Codrus) and the Athenians built a temple to Dionysus on the location of the fight.

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Plato and his dialogues : Home - Biography - Works - History of interpretation - New hypotheses - Map of dialogues : table version or non tabular version. Tools : Index of persons and locations - Detailed and synoptic chronologies - Maps of Ancient Greek World. Site information : About the author.

First published January 4, 1998 - Last updated December 6, 1998
© 1998 Bernard SUZANNE (click on name to send your comments via e-mail)
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